Thursday, March 31, 2011

8 Women at BAM

Last night at BAM we saw 8 Women, a murder mystery-comedy-musical starring a cross-section of France's most famous actresses: Ludivine Sagnier, Emmanuelle Béart, Fanny Ardant, Isabelle Huppert, and Catherine Deneuve. We found the farce of these eight beautiful women trapped in a house together, each suspecting the other of having murdered the only man, rather delightful. But we especially liked the way the three Deneuve movies we saw allowed us to witness Deneuve's progression, from demure young lady to self-possessed middle-aged beauty to well-heeled matriarch.  

Photo: thanks
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Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Helping Hand by Overunder + No Touching Ground

Helping Hand by Overunder + No Touching Ground

Over time, this charitably inspired piece by Overunder and No Touching Ground will peel off to reveal another work beneath.

Helping Hand by Overunder + No Touching Ground

Helping Hand by Overunder + No Touching Ground

Helping Hand by Overunder + No Touching Ground

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Serious Eats: cc's cafe

Hey everyone, we're also writing about New York for Serious Eats. Periodically we'll link to content here that we produced there.

Curry sandwich, cc's cafe
Our latest contribution to A Sandwich a Day highlights the curry sandwich at cc's cafe, a delightful shoe box of a restaurant in the West Village [read more].
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Monday, March 28, 2011

The Last Metro at BAM

François Truffaut's homage to Word War II-era France, The Last Metro, screened this weekend at BAM, part of its month-long celebration of the great Catherine Deneuve. Here she plays a stringent theater owner, even lovelier than when playing an uptight housewife with masochistic fantasies. The movie, alas, has aged less well, preferring nostalgia to realism, muted emotion to passion. But that icy beauty and haughty mien transport us just the same. 

Photo: thanks
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Serious Eats: Favela Grill

Hey everyone, we're also writing about New York for Serious Eats. Periodically we'll link to content here that we produced there.

Feijoada, Favela Grill
This week's Date Night finds us at Favela Grill in Astoria, eating way too much feijoada and falling in love with Brazilian soda [read more].
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Sunday, March 27, 2011

How & Nosm Mural in Williamsburg

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

How&Nosm, Bird of Prey

Saturday, March 26, 2011

Bill Cunningham New York at Film Forum


Last night we were finally able to get tickets to the most popular movie in New York, and now we have a new favorite New Yorker. The ungrammatically titled Bill Cunningham New York, selling out every showing at Film Forum in the West Village, showcases the extraordinarily lovable octogenarian photographer of street fashion and high society. A modern ascetic, Cunningham eschews any of the comforts of the people he photographs, pedaling his bike all over town in his taped-together poncho and cheap blue smock (the same worn by sanitation workers in Paris). An uncompromising commitment to his work mingles with wide-eyed enthusiasm about the perpetual show that New York's streets put on. 

Photos: thanks
I love

Friday, March 25, 2011

Billboard Art at Gavin Brown's Enterprise

Grammar goes first

Gavin Brown's Enterprise

Gavin Brown's Enterprise


Thursday, March 24, 2011

LIC Market

Slab bacon with cabbage and sherry vinaigrette, LIC Market

Like a Cracker Barrel for locavores, LIC Market in Long Island City combines eating and shopping, with a small stand at the front selling local jams, pickles, and such, and a slightly less small dining room in the back. Though it channels the same urban rustic vibe you can find all over town, it feels fresher, with a light, airy space and delicate, lovely centerpieces counterbalancing the rough-hewn tables.

LIC Market

Our meal started with a plate of house breads --- buttery biscuits, hearty multigrain, and moist carrot, accompanied by a small bowl of sweet apple butter.

Carrot bread, multigrain bread, biscuits, and apple butter, LIC Market

On a sunny spring Saturday, the aparagus frittata with cherry tomatoes had to be ordered, and it hit all of the crisp and sweet notes we hoped it would. At the opposite end of the scale, the slab bacon with braised cabbage and sherry vinaigrette recalled the recently passed St. Patrick's Day and its requisite corned beef and cabbage. Slab bacon, however, trumps corned beef every time: juicier and richer, to say nothing of the inherent flavor superiority of pork. Sadly, it wasn't for sale up front.

Asparagus and tomato frittata, LIC Market

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Monday, March 21, 2011

Serious Eats: Zerza

Hey everyone, we're also writing about New York for Serious Eats. Periodically we'll link to content here that we produced there.

Bastilla, Zerza
This week's Date Night finds us at Zerza, in the East Village, discovering the delightful sweet-savory disk known as the bastilla [read more].
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Sunday, March 20, 2011

Experimental Comedy at PS1

Song

Pretty much everyone in New York was at yesterday's Saturday Session at PS1 in Long Island City. After braving the Kafkaesque line and sitting on the floor (!) of the packed, sweaty events room, we were treated to an afternoon of comedy art, or art comedy, or armedy or something. Curator Miriam Katz brought together Jon Glaser (aka The Man in the Green Mask), Dave Hill, Jenny Slate, and the inimitable Reggie Watts for songs, stories, bon mots, and the occasional profanity. Hilarity ensued.
I love!

Saturday, March 19, 2011

Rubirosa

Rubirosa
For years now, no one other than tourists with out-of-date guidebooks would dream of going to an Italian restaurant on Mulberry Street. Then Torrisi opened, and everyone everywhere stood in line to get in. And now there's Rubirosa, an achingly trendy spot helmed by a scion of the legendary Staten Island pizza joint Joe & Pat's.

Rubirosa
The service is spotty, the tables awkwardly placed and spaced. But the pizza is so thin it has to be eaten to be believed. We ordered the classic with tomato sauce and mozzarella, sold by a reference to a fifty-year-old recipe on the menu, and the sausage, broccoli rabe, and pecorino. Somehow, despite the crust's leanness, each pie held its toppings. While we wouldn't go so far as to call it the "best pizza in New York," as New York magazine just did, we discovered that the occasional crunchy pizza can be satisfying.  

Rubirosa

Friday, March 18, 2011

Oyster Locals: New York's Best Movie Theaters

Hey everyone, we're also writing about New York for Oyster Locals, a web resource for travelers. Periodically we'll feature content on here that we produced there.

Theater, Museum of the Moving Image

New York is a movie town. Celebrities live and walk among us; nobody minds too much when a block is closed off to accommodate a shooting schedule, especially because you can sometimes sneak treats off the crafts services table. Most importantly, practically every movie released in the United States plays here, so there’s always something to see: from Bollywood imports to mainstream bromances to a way-past-our-bedtime screening of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. For us, the best movie theaters have some combination of history, architectural impressiveness, comfy seats, excellent programming, and really good popcorn.

Gone are the famous theaters of yore like the Bleeker Street Cinema. But gritty realism hasn’t disappeared from the West Village’s Angelika, where the rumble of the F train next door occasionally obstructs the sound, a reminder of the days when the city was bankrupt and auteurs like Scorsese and Schrader ruled. The selection skews arthouse, with films like Restrepo and Blue Valentine opening. Frequently, writers, directors, or actors will pop in unannounced to introduce the very first showing and stay for a short Q&A. Excellent baked goods for sale in the cafe.

Prior to its screenings, such as the latest movie by Kelly Reichardt or newly restored Lawrence of Arabia, Film Forum runs a short clip advertising its membership: it opens in 1970 and depicts a small room with a bunch of folding chairs, the very first incarnation of the now-legion indie cinema in the West Village. Here we’ve seen Susan Sarandon, Frances McDormand, and Ed Norton --- not on screen, but in the audience, watching new releases and repertory classics like a double feature of The Searchers and Stagecoach. Despite the obstructed seating and salt-free popcorn, if we had to spend the rest of our lives going to the pictures in one place, this would be it.

Newly remodeled, the movie theater at the Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, Queens, has triangular sound paneling, plush stadium-style seating, and programming that’s happily focused on smaller movies, especially by international directors. Food or drink isn’t allowed, alas, but the admission lets you roam around the museum for a while, full of fascinating artifacts like the wig worn by Robert De Niro in Taxi Driver and a marked-up shooting script for Citizen Kane. Kids will love the display of Star Wars action figures. We always make sure to play a few rounds of Donkey Kong in the upstairs video arcade.

The Brooklyn Academy of Music has some of the best popcorn in the city. This Fort Greene theater also shows a mix of old and new, with an emphasis on work by or starring minorities. Check the calendar for upcoming special events (a few weeks ago, for example, Alan Rickman introduced a screening of Die Hard).

The popcorn at the Ziegfeld isn’t so bad either, but we go to this Midtown palace to re-capture some of the glamour of movie-going gone by. Once upon a time, going to the movies was an event that required hat and heels, where you would perhaps suck discreetly on a mint, not gulp down 72 ounces of cola. The Ziegfeld --- with its ginormous balcony, maroon drapery, and bathroom stalls featuring their own sinks --- brings us back to that time, even as we’re watching a special screening of Raiders of the Lost Ark or the latest from Disney.

Late nights belong to IFC and Sunshine. It took years to convert the beloved, decrepit Waverly into the International Film Center, but the wait was worth it: soft seats, human-scale theaters, and programming devoted to the best of foreign and domestic arthouse. Showing mostly independents and imports, both theaters also screen cult classics for night owls. Recent offerings include The Shining (at 11.40 pm) and Rear Window (at midnight). Sunshine, once home to the Lower East Side’s happening Yiddish vaudeville, also has a weekly Rattle & Reel, an early afternoon screening, for hipsters and their toddlers.

If it’s glamour you’re after, stay at the Plaza New York City, close to the Paris Theater, a 60-something-year-old institution showing, as you might expect from the name, lots of French imports. For a chance to glimpse movie stars in the flesh, stay at The Bowery Hotel New York City.
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Thursday, March 17, 2011

Bogart Street Tags

Bogart Street

Bogart Street

Bogart Street

Bogart Street

Bogart Street

Bogart Street

Bogart Street

Bogart Street

Bogart Street

Bogart Street

Bogart Street

Bogart Street

Bogart Street

Bogart Street

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