Friday, October 29, 2010

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Sip Sak

Simit, Sip Sak

Decorwise, Sip Sak says "romantic French bistro," with sconces and a pressed tin ceiling, an elegance that speaks to the country's history as an empire. No battered golden plates or lopsided tapestries --- those hallmarks of cheapo falafel joints. Foodwise, this restaurant in Midtown East features Turkish specialties like ezme (a chopped tomato salad dossed in pomegranate molasses) and borek (feta cheese rolled in phyllo and fried). Servicewise, though, it's as New York as you can get, with ponytailed-owner Orhan Yegen buzzing around, futzing over each customer, wanting to know if the grilled lamb sausage tastes good (oh, yes) and positively beaming if you order a dish without totally mangaling its actual name. We stuck with the easy ones, like sesame-covered simit and kibbi (meatballs).

Ezme, Sip Sak

Borek, Sip Sak

Kibbi, Sip Sak

Lamb sausage, Sip Sak

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Peter Pan

Red velvet donut and old-fashioned cake donut, Peter Pan

When you walk into Peter Pan Donut and Pastry Shop, you half-expect your cell phone to stop working and Eisenhower to be on the radio. Although Greenpoint gets hipper by the day, Peter Pan stays the same, its donuts (like the red velvet, old-fashioned cake, and coconut) as consistently tasty as its coffee is bad. Neighbors gather and jaw about schools and fires and taxes and who's sick and who's getting married and, if they're smart, when the next batch is coming out.

Chocolate coconut donut and regular coconut donut, Peter Pan

Oyster Locals: New York's Best Candy Stores

Hey everyone, we're also writing about New York for Oyster Locals, a web resource for travelers. Periodically we'll feature content on here that we produced there.
Old Time Favorites, Economy Candy

’Tis the season for candy. Buy one bag of fun-size Skittles to hand out to trick-or-treaters, buy two bags to snack on while waiting for the doorbell to ring --- or at least that’s how it works at our house. This year, though, we just might give out chocolate-dipped apricots, sesame chews, or some of the other amazing sweeties available at New York’s best candy stores.

Carry On Tea & Sympathy
At this retail emporium in the West Village, trucks are lorries, “cheers” means “thanks,” and the Union Jack flaps proudly in the breeze. In addition to teas, soft drinks, biscuits, and other sundries from across the pond, Carry on Tea & Sympathy stocks a tremendous assortment of British candy bars, including Curly Wurlys (a delicate swirl of milk chocolate-coated caramel) and Kit Kat Chunkies (same flavor as, but at least six times the girth of, a regular Kit Kat). If you prefer your treats fruity and chewy, try the wine gums. God save the owner!

Stay at the Standard, a few blocks west of Carry On (110 Greenwich Avenue, 212.989.9735).

Dewey’s
Dewey’s lets you mix and match similarly priced items from the old-fashioned, wide-mouthed glass containers, which makes this place ideal for those folks who like two licorice dogs mixed with six yellow gumballs and several pieces of almond bark. Tables feature prepackaged goodies like Cow Tales and candy necklaces. Pristine white walls offset the kaleidoscopic array of calories --- er, colors --- including the head-sized multicolored lollipops hanging from the ceiling.

Stay at the London and take the F train to York Street, then walk to Dewey’s (141 Front Street, Brooklyn, 718.422.1333).

Economy Candy
So, OK, it’s a bit dusty. And, sure, if you bump a shelf, you just might get buried by the towering boxes of Nerds and imported pastilles that extend way up to the ceiling. But every successful candy store in the city owes a debt to Economy Candy, a must-visit for anyone who dares call him- or herself a candy freak. Seemingly everything is in stock: chocolate-covered gummi bears, rock candy, Big League Chew, Now & Laters, rootbeer barrels, even giant Homer Simpson pez dispensers. In back, they have huge blocks of speckled halvah, alongside at least 20 of the official 50 Jelly Belly flavors. The self-proclaimed “Nosher’s Paradise on the Lower East Side” has been family owned since 1937. We love it here.

Stay at the Hotel on Rivington, across the street from Economy Candy (108 Rivington Street, 1.800.352.4544).

Fa Guo San Candy Shop USA
We say “candy corn” and “marshmallow pumpkins”; the folks at Fa Guo San Candy Shop USA say “preserved sesame codfish” and “fried cuttlefish.” This Chinatown boutique will expand your sense of what counts as a sweet treat. In addition to bin after bin of colorfully wrapped gummys, chocolates, and suckers (we like the toffeelike Thai Durian and Morigana Hi-Chews, imported from Japan) are tiny free samples of preserved fruits and savories, including tomato and “vegetarian dough dice.” A strict “no loitering” policy limits the amount you can try, so be judicious in your choices. We recommend --- and always stock up on --- the pleasantly biting menthol lemon and tangy plum.

Stay at Hotel 91 and walk a few blocks to Candy Shop USA (48 Mott Street, 212.233.8838).

Słodycze Wedel
New York has plenty of places catering to our sweet teeth, but only at Słodycze Wedel can we get tasty delights and pick up a smattering of Polska. This small but cute shop in the Polish section of Greenpoint specializes in wrapped candies from the old country, where fruits are incorporated to a pleasantly surprising degree. Though English descriptions are taped to each overflowing bin, part of the fun is trying to figure out what exactly you’re buying. “Marcepan” is easy enough, and “Mietowe” has a picture of a mint leaf on the front, while “Piernikowa” and “Bajeczny” have to be tasted (and, to be honest, re-tasted) to be translated. “Pyszny,” we say.

Stay at the Nu Hotel and take the G train to Greenpoint Avenue, then walk to Słodycze Wedel (772 Manhattan Avenue, Brooklyn, 718.349.3933).

The Sweet Life
Since 1982, The Sweet Life has proudly lived up to its motto: “anything can be dipped in chocolate.” This bulk candy store on the Lower East Side sells the usual assortment of goodies --- dried fruits, hard candies, jelly beans, gummy frogs, kookaburra licorice, etc., etc. --- in long rows of neatly labeled apothecary jars. More special are the original creations made on site. We’re particularly partial to the softy pop, a marshmallow robed in chocolate and stuck on a stick; the chocolate- and M&M-covered pretzel; and the oranges and apricots dipped in chocolate, which allows us to delude ourselves that we’re getting in a food group besides “sugar.”

Stay at the Thompson LES, a short walk away from The Sweet Life (63 Hester Street, 1.800.692.6887).

Monday, October 25, 2010

Williamsburg Street Art

  • Roa and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamwall

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Beast Rock Studio

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Williamsburg street art

Beast Rock Studio

Williamsburg street art

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